Sydenham High celebrates the art of being curious for National Science and Engineering Week

Sydenham High School was buzzing with scientific curiosity last week as the school celebrated National Science & Engineering Week (17-23 March) with a raft of activities, talks, quizzes and demonstrations all on the theme of ‘being curious’.

Students in year 8 ran an impressive Science Fair attended by pupils and staff from across the school, including girls from years 4, 5 and 6 at Junior School.  The girls were able to visit an impressive range of stalls focusing on different aspects of science from: diet, the brain, how the body moves and the workings of forces to ultrasound, insulation and astronomy.

Fire flies, fish dissection and Ruben’s tube were the focus of a demonstrations day and the school’s four Houses competed in a science quiz which even included a round to see which team could make the most noise to be detected on a noise meter!

Balloon debates were also held to decide which of three famous scientist should jump out and who should be saved because of the importance of their discovery.  Michael Farraday (electricity) won the day in the end, against Alexander Fleming (Penicillin) and Friedrich Miescher (DNA) as the other balloon passengers.

The week concluded with a whole school assembly on the fascinating subject of forensic science from James Gooch of the Department of Forensic & Analytical Science, School of Biomedical Science, Kings College, London.  He also ran more specific lecturers for years 10 and 11.

“Curiosity has always been at the heart of scientific discovery,” said Sydenham High Headteacher Kathryn Pullen.  “Everything from computers and mobile phones to medical scanners and space travel owe their existence to science for curiosity’s sake.  I am sure that this week of events has fuelled our girls’ interest in science and engineering, which is still a very male dominated field, but also their general curiosity in the world around them.”